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Discussion: Konstantin Krimmel

  1. #1
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    juin 2011
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    Konstantin Krimmel

    Si celui-ci n'est pas extraordinaire :



    „Der Feuerreiter“ - Hugo Wolf
    Konstantin Krimmel - Bariton. Doriana Tchakarova - am Flügel

  2. #2
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    Cela se confirme :



    „Des Fischers Liebesglück“ - Franz Schubert, D.933
    Konstantin Krimmel - Bariton. Doriana Tchakarova - am Flügel


    IP

  3. #3
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    février 2008
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    6 339
    Pas encore 30 ans - le timbre est clair encore mais somptueux, tout l’art du chant en toutes ses facettes est déjà là, prometteur, si les petits cochons etc. et s’il a un/des agents qui savent ce que c’est qu’un talent et savent le servir, la carrière sera belle.
    La pianiste, jeune aussi, n’est ‘pas mal’ non plus et est tout aussi prometteuse.
    Belle découverte, merci.

  4. #4
    Modérateur Avatar de lebewohl
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    octobre 2007
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    Paris
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    J'avais perdu ça dans les nouveautés! Oui c'est splendide. En cherchant des renseignements sur lui, je découvre qu'il a enregistré un disque de ballades, dont celle-ci (la vidéo est, je crois, encore antérieure). Celle-ci parce que le hasard fait que je me suis intéressé à ce texte, ces jours-ci, mais cette version est un peu méconnue.

    Il s'engendre beaucoup d'abus au monde ou, pour le dire plus hardiment, tous les abus du monde s'engendrent de ce qu'on nous apprend à craindre de faire profession de notre ignorance.

    Montaigne

  5. #5
    Modérateur Avatar de lebewohl
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    octobre 2007
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    Pour compléter, je copie ici (en v.o.) une interview de Krimmel qui vient de paraître dans la revue "Fanfare" à l'occasion de la sortie de son (de leur, la pianiste compte aussi) premier disque. Les interviews dans Fanfare ont souvent un caractère publicitaire avoué, mais enfin ce disque est vraiment tentant! Il y a trois autres critiques dans le numéro, toutes favorables, avec le grain de sel ci-dessus.

    Baritone Konstantin Krimmel and pianist Doriana Tchakarova’s new CD on the Alpha Classics label, Saga, explores the world of the German ballad. I had the pleasure of interviewing these two artists about their superb recording.

    As this is your first interview for Fanfare, perhaps you could tell us about your backgrounds and careers, and how you became musical collaborators.

    We both met at the State University of Music and Performing Arts in Stuttgart. Doriana is from Bulgaria and I’m half German and half Romanian. I grew up in a boy’s choir, and so the singing was always part of my life. Three years ago Doriana and I started working together, and it’s a perfect match. We started doing competitions, and it all went very well, and now we we’re very happy that it’s working so well. We’re enjoying all the great possibilities and concerts.

    Your new Alpha Classics CD, Saga, explores the genre of the 19th-century German ballad. What distinguishes a ballad like Schubert’s Der Zwerg from, say, that same composer’s Frühingsglaube?

    Frühingsglaube is a simple strophic song, a nature description. There are many such songs in Schubert’s work. Der Zwerg, on the other hand, is a ballad with three different characters. This is a rarity in the Lied repertoire of Schubert. The singer sings in three different voices: the Dwarf, his mistress the queen (whom the Dwarf strangles with a red silk scarf in the song), and the narrator. And like the singer, the piano also is talking in these three characters. The difficulty is to set forth the three characters despite the uniform pattern of the piano part as a singer and pianist.

    Are there any challenges for the performers especially associated with the ballad, as opposed to the Lied?

    The challenge of a ballad is to tell the story in an exciting way. Compared to a song, the ballad is mostly about a fairytale or a legend. Thus, there are very many different emotional worlds, from loving to highly dramatic, and sometimes you have to switch very fast from one to another. And also sometimes you have different characters in the same piece, so you have to change the colour of the voice and the attitude for each part.

    The genre of the 19th-century German ballad comprises an incredibly rich and diverse body of work. How did you go about selecting the specific ballads included on this disc?

    We had a few ballads done before the CD production and, we wanted to search and sing more of that exciting genre. So we looked for more fairytales and sagas which fit into our structure of programming. We wanted different composers, also unknown ones, and a wide variety of emotions, characters, and stories.

    Each of the ballads featured on your Alpha Classics CD has its own narrative structure and flow. But the selection and sequencing of the various ballads on this CD present an overarching narrative as well.

    We tried to create a big story with a red thread through all of the little single ones, from the lovely and innocent part, through the dramatic worlds to hell and back, to the simple man helping the godfather Odin. There is Tom, who fell in love with the beautiful queen of the elves. Then there is the first dead person after a wedding, the bride herself. And so on: There come more and more different characters, like knights and dwarfs and gods, and we are descending more and more into the dark depths. In the end we are back in the spot of people helping gods.

    Franz Schubert, Carl Loewe, and Robert Schumann are all well-known composers of Lieder and ballads. Perhaps the name of Adolf Jensen will be less familiar to our Fanfare readers. Tell us about him, and the trio of Jensen ballads you included on this disc.

    We also wanted to include some unknown Romantic ballads on the CD, because we are always interested in presenting beautiful rarities of the repertoire. We already knew Adolf Jensen’s Waldesgespräch, so we continued to research his works and found the other two stories, which fit perfectly with the text and mood of our collection. Jensen’s musical language is very instrumental. The piano has a big part and a very important voice of its own. In Die Braut there is a big interlude, which tells the part of the story when the boy and the bride get lost in the water. And in this part there are no words, just the music ... it’s absolutely strong.

    You chose to include Carl Loewe’s setting of Goethe’s Erlkönig, as opposed to Schubert’s iconic version. The Loewe version is well known in its own right. But I’m curious as to what elements of Loewe’s setting led you to feature it on this disc.

    Both settings are amazing and beautiful in their differences. We have chosen the Loewe one to show, just like Waldesgespräch of Jensen, how different the same words can sound. For example the tremolo in Loewe’s piece is demonstrating the father’s and the son’s fear. Nearly the same musical figure, the triplets, in Schubert’s version show the running horse. It is very interesting sometimes how different on the one hand and how similar on the other hand these two pieces are and they can easily be seen on the same level.

    Are there any artists from the past or present whom you find particularly compelling in this repertoire, and what do you admire about their artistry?

    Christian Gerhaher/Gerold Huber or Ian Bostridge/Julius Drake are of course two of the main Lied duos today who shape this repertoire very much. Both of them have a very intelligent and special way to explain, sing and play that music. But also Hermann Prey/Helmut Deutsch and of course the great Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau with Gerald Moore have made, for example, Carl Loewe and the world of his ballads very popular.

    Tell us about some projects that are on the horizon for you both. Can we expect more recordings showcasing your collaborations?

    A second CD with completely different facets is scheduled next year. And it is absolutely stunning to have nearly 30 Lied recitals around Europe in the following season. We would like to bring all these beautiful fairytales and myths into the concert halls because they’re worth telling and hearing. There will be concerts in Barcelona, Frankfurt, Blaibach, Munich, Reutlingen, Stuttgart, Fulda, Bamberg, and London.

    SAGA • Konstantin Krimmel (bar); Doriana Tchakarova (piano) • ALPHA 549 (62:47 Text and Translation)

    LOEWE Tom der Reimer. Herr Oluf. Erlkönig. Odins Meeresritt. JENSEN Die Braut. Rübezahl. Waldesgespräch. SCHUBERT Der Zwerg. Gruppe aus dem Tartarus. Prometheus. SCHUMANN Belsazar. Die feindlichen Brüder. Die beiden Grenadiere

    A new release on the Alpha Classics label explores the world of the German ballad, in performances by the German-Romanian baritone Konstantin Krimmel and Bulgarian pianist Doriana Tchakarova. It is a grand success in every way. Krimmel is a baritone with a gorgeous lyric voice that maintains its beauty, and where needed, power, throughout the registers. In these performances of narrative works, Krimmel is attuned to each and every plot twist and turn, which he conveys in a manner devoid of any contrivance or artificiality. In short, Krimmel is a master storyteller. The crystal-clear natural diction, pristine legato, and brilliant deployment of a wide range of dynamics, are all the hallmarks of a master singer. An internet search revealed Krimmel’s birth year as 1993. The achievement on this recording would be worthy of an artist in full maturity, one able to call upon a lifetime’s experience of singing. That Krimmel was approximately 26 when he made the recording in March of 2019 is nothing short of remarkable. Here’s hoping we will be able to enjoy this artist’s journey for years to come. Here, pianist Doriana Tchakarova is an equally compelling force. It is clear from my interview with Krimmel and Tchakarova that they are kindred artistic spirits, and the intensity of collaboration on this disc is striking. Tchakarova’s playing is mightily impressive both on a technical and interpretive level. It’s gratifying, too, that the recorded sound of this disc captures both artists in their full tonal glory, with a marvelous balance of voice and piano. The repertoire mixes the familiar and less so, with the inclusion of three ballads by Adolf Jensen (1837–1879) a welcome component. The liner notes quote Jensen as aiming to “transfer the application of Wagner’s ideas of Beauty and Truth to smaller forms.” I have to say I hear more of Schumann in the ballads included here, but in any event, Jensen writes in a fluent, compelling manner that makes full use of the narrative potential in both the voice and piano. The booklet includes an expressive introductory essay by Krimmel, superb liner notes by Susan Youens, artist bios, and full texts and translations (in English and French). A success in every way, and highly recommended. Ken Meltzer
    Il s'engendre beaucoup d'abus au monde ou, pour le dire plus hardiment, tous les abus du monde s'engendrent de ce qu'on nous apprend à craindre de faire profession de notre ignorance.

    Montaigne

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